W.O.D. Monday 11/18/19

17
Nov

W.O.D. Monday 11/18/19

DAILY MINDSET
“One can have no smaller or greater mastery, than mastery of oneself.” –Leonardo DiVinci

Leonardi DiVinci was one of the first documented individuals to believe that humans could take flight. Before such an idea became a mainstream success… talk about a horrific idea! The thought of hurling a human into the air, like a bird, with no guarantee of landing.

The above quote speaks to his greatest accomplishment. His mastery over his mind. He well knew of the risks, and well recognized the fears. But he believed it to be possible through it all.

The one person that will stop of us from doing what we want to do, looks back at us in the mirror.
It’s good to acknowledge that the primary job of our brain is to keep us safe. It’s going to try to keep us away from risk, danger, and failure.

It’s you versus you.


This is a benchmark complex in which athletes will hold onto the bar for all 9 repetitions before dropping the barbell. We’ll begin the day and prepare for the workout by building to a heavy, yet good looking complex. We’ll be completing the same complex in the workout, however athletes are now allowed to breakup the barbell movements however they’d like. The limiting factor of the three movements is likely the push jerks. This should be a weight that athletes could cycle 20+ push jerks when fresh. Also, in order to move for the majority of the 12 minutes, the toes to bar variation should be something athletes could complete unbroken if needed. Some other options here include lowering the total reps or complexity so this movement takes no more than 2-3 sets within the workout.

THE WHY:
Some common themes for functional movement include: midline stabilization, effective stance and grip, core to extremity movement, sound hip function, active shoulders, full range of motion about a joint, balance about the frontal plane, and posterior chain engagement. Many athletes will exhibit faults in one or more of these areas. As coaches, there is so much that we could teach in a day. Rather than trying to do it all, we can pick our battles and keep our instruction (just like the programming) varied across the weeks. While there will always be other faults to correct, having a focus makes it easier to see and correct certain movements. This focus also gives athletes a goal for right now. If they’re able to get even 1% better at that one thing today, they will get exponentially better over time.


Strength – 15 minutes

Build to Heavy Unbroken Complex:
3 Power Cleans
3 Front Squats
3 Push Jerks


Conditioning WOD – 12 minutes

As many rounds + reps as possible in 12 minutes of…
3 Rounds of the clean complex (135/95)
15 Toes to Bar

Complex: 3 Power Cleans, 3 Front Squats, 3 Push Jerks

THE WHY:
Some common themes for functional movement include: midline stabilization, effective stance and grip, core to extremity movement, sound hip function, active shoulders, full range of motion about a joint, balance about the frontal plane, and posterior chain engagement. Many athletes will exhibit faults in one or more of these areas. As coaches, there is so much that we could teach in a day. Rather than trying to do it all, we can pick our battles and keep our instruction (just like the programming) varied across the weeks. While there will always be other faults to correct, having a focus makes it easier to see and correct certain movements. This focus also gives athletes a goal for right now. If they’re able to get even 1% better at that one thing today, they will get exponentially better over time.

MOBILITY

Front Rack Stretch – 1 Minute
Laying on your chest, place our elbows out in front, arms bent at 90 degrees. The goal is to close the gap between the armpits and the floor, which will stretch the lats, shoulders, and triceps.

Squat Hold – 1 Minute
Assume the bottom of the squat. The goal here is to get the hips as close to the heels as possible, drive the knees out, and keep the heels on the ground.

TEACHING
TOES TO BAR

Starts in the Shoulders
Although the toes and the lower body is what makes contact with the bar, the kipping motion starts in the upper body with the shoulders. With legs long and feet glued together, the athletes will push down on the bar to elevate the body upwards and pull the chest back through to the arch position. This press down is a similar movement to shutting the trunk of a car. If the hips lead the way in the kip, it will result in a swing and a longer distance for the toes to make contact with the bar.

Tension
Maintaining tension is one of the most important aspects of the kip. A great example of tension not being maintained is when athletes have to double kip. This double kip can be a result of a passive return of the legs after the toes hit the bar and relaxed shoulders. Instead of letting gravity bring the legs down, have athletes return their knees back down to the chest and drive the feet down and back while pulling the chest forward. This will put them into a tense arch position and help them maintain rhythm in their kip.

Movement Prep
10 Scap Pull-ups
5 Kip Swings
1-3 Strict Toes to Bar
5 Knees to Chest
5 Toes to Bar

Movement Substitutions
Reduce Reps
Feet as High as Possible
Knees to Chest
Knees to Waist

POWER CLEANS

Down, Not Out
When receiving the barbell, especially when the bar is heavy or the legs are fatigued, it is common for athletes to jump their feet too wide instead of pulling their shoulders under the bar. Ideally, we are moving from a good jumping position to a good landing position. The jumping position we’re looking for starts with the feet directly under the hips. This is a position that athletes would wipe their feet on a doormat from. The landing position is essentially squat stance. Any wide than shoulder width here is too wide. We’ll find these positions without a bar to prime the movement before adding weight.

Hook Grip
Hook grip is an essential piece to the olympic lifts. It’s not only important for having the most secure grip on the barbell, but it also helps athletes achieve a powerful hip extension. When the hook grip is not utilized, athletes cannot complete a very powerful jump because the bar may fly out of their hands if they do. The may also cause athletes to bend their arms early. The reason many athletes do not use it is because it is uncomfortable. Getting comfortable with the hook grip will pay off in the long run for those athletes who are not accustomed to using it. It also helps minimize the forearm burn in grippy workouts. Encourage everyone to use it with they empty bar work today to build up tolerance.

FRONT SQUATS
Fingertips
While athletes will want to utilize the hook grip when moving the bar from the ground to the shoulder, it can be difficult to maintain high elbows based on mobility. Following the last power clean, athletes can lose the hook grip to let the bar sit back into the fingertips. This loose grip is better for allowing athletes to drive the elbows high and maintain an upright chest throughout the squat. The number of fingers wrapped underneath the bar will be athlete dependent. More mobile athletes may be able to keep an upright position with 4 fingers under, while less mobile athletes may need 1-2 fingers wrapped under to keep their elbows high.

PUSH JERKS
Grip Transition
Touching on grip one last time for the push jerk. While a loose fingertip grip was ideal for front squats, where the bar is supported by the body, a fuller grip is better for getting the barbell from the shoulder to overhead. Following the last front squat, athletes can come out of the hole aggressively and get a little extra hip pop. This hip pop creates a moment of elevation on the bar and allows athletes to reset their hands. When resetting the hands, we’re looking for a loose, but secure grip. The thumb should be in front of the bar with all four fingers wrapped underneath. This will allow athletes to best support the barbell on the shoulders and overhead.

STRATEGY
The first movement, the power cleans, are the best way to pace out this complex. Coming back to the ground on every rep allows athletes to perform these as single repetitions to conserve some energy. Once the bar is on the shoulders at the completion of the third power clean, athletes can aim to hold on for the 3 front squats and 3 push jerks unbroken. Having to break here means completing extra power cleans that don’t count productively towards today’s score. Taking the extra time before picking up the third power clean is better than breaking the squats and jerks.

On the toes to bar, 2-3 sets is likely sustainable throughout the workout. Breaking these up into smaller chunks also enables athletes to start their first set faster following the last push jerk. Gearing up for 5 reps is easier mentally and physically than 10 or 15.